Monday, September 3, 2012

Swiss Days and Scones

 


I grew up nestled beneath the majesty of Mount Timpanogos in the Wasatch Mountains. My father, grew up on the other side of that same mountain in a little farming town called Midway.  As a little girl we would spend weekends taking the 30 minute drive up the canyon to visit family and friends.  My dad would tell stories of the canyon, small towns, and the Legend of Timpanogos to help pass the "loooong" drive through the beautiful waterfall filled canyon. 


Every Labor Day Weekend, however, we'd make the trip for something special - Midway Swiss Days.


My maiden name is "Probst" - an unmistakable Swiss name.  The Probst's along with a handful of other Swiss families settled in the Heber Valley more than 125 years ago.  Swiss Days is a way to pay homage to their Swiss heritage.

I have such fond memories of Swiss Days.  The yodelers in Lederhosen.  The sound of the Alphorn in the parade. And, spending hours in the tennis courts filled with kids games and prizes.

However, the one thing that stands out the most to me are the Swiss Bratzeli's and Scones. It's worth making the trip, searching for a parking spot, and fighting the crowds for these two items ALONE!

Since I couldn't be in Midway for Swiss Days this year, I figured I'd make up a batch of Utah Scones to celebrate here in Texas.

Utah Scones/Swiss Taco
  • First start with your favorite basic bread recipe (here's one to get you started). 
  • Roll out dough, cut or shape and fry in vegetable oil until golden on both sides.
  • Serve with honey-butter and cinnamon/sugar.  So good!




In addition to the food and entertainment, the town square is filled to the brim with booths loaded with charming merchandise. I haven't been to Swiss Days for a couple of years now, but I thought I'd include a few pictures of some of the booths and merchandise from my last visit.


This is my cute dad standing by the white gazebo in the middle of town square. The bulk of the entertainment is performed in this little gazebo.  It was originally built on wheels for my grandfather's band - The Midway Swiss Band - and for years they would play as the gazebo was pulled in the Swiss Days Parade.






There is never a shortage of beautifully handcrafted items.  This booth was selling tutu's wrapped like cotton candy.

Maybe, hopefully, next year we will make it home for a visit. It's been so hot in Texas. I'm so longing for a reprieve from the heat and humidity. I'll admit I'm homesick for that cool breeze blowing out of the canyon, the soft green grass between my toes, and a chance to see a few fall leaves signaling autumn is at the doorstep. I can't wait to get a hot scone and share some memories with family while we enjoy a little of our Swiss heritage amongst the madness of the crowds and crafts.

If you ever find yourself in Utah over Labor Day weekend - head to Swiss Days, you'll love it.

3 comments:

Aimee said...

I am going to have to make these! I didn't know that this kind of scone was considered Swiss. :)

We make brastlis at Christmas each year, if you don't have a recipe for them let me know and I will give you the one we use (we just use a pizzelle press since brastli presses are super expensive to import).

Charmain said...

Aimee - I don't think they're considered Swiss. I think they are actually considered a "Utah Scone." And they call them Swiss Tacos instead of Navajo Tacos, because, well, it's Swiss Days and they can do that if they want!

I would love your recipe! My parent's have a Bratzeli press, and my mom would make them for special occasions. I'd love to get one, but you're right, they are pricey!

Charmain said...

btw...did you make it up to Midway this year?